Andrew Singleton (he series)

Administrator, Office of the Provost, Tufts University
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  • United States of America

About Andrew Singleton (he series)

Andrew Singleton has recently joined the Tufts-Laidlaw Undergraduate Research and Leadership Programme team as a Programme Administrator and is excited to continue to elevate the Laidlaw Programming for current and future scholars. He joined the programme from Venture Café, which connects and educates the entrepreneurial and innovation community in Boston through programs/spaces/events and many other cities around the world. He has a B.S. from MIT in Biology and a background in social-impact enterprises, wind-power, user-computer-interfaces, as well as computer network design. In his spare time, Andrew enjoys travel, hiking, and wildlife photography.

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University Administrator

University

Tufts University

Area of Expertise

Coaching and Mentoring Entrepreneurship Leadership Technology

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Princess, great post on Simon's cannon of work. If don't mind, I'd like to add his talk on Why Good Leaders Make You Feel Safe. During the talk, he showcases a few wonderful examples from the military to industry, however, more applicable to Laidlaw Scholars may be this quote from Disney/Pixar President Dr. Ed Catmull when talking about innovation and the future:

"about the future, I’ve never predicted the future, not even technically, because things keep changing. You want to create an environment where it’s safe and you can change. I don’t know what the future is, but I do know that you have a lot of smart people here, and you want to keep them free to let them create something that’s unpredictable."

With a place where people feel able to be brave, they can seek Sinek's "Whys". Those "Whys" help us understand how to transform our world and support our communities gain the long view of the "Infinite Game".

Replying to Princess Agina

Andrew, thank you for sharing this insightful reflection on Charles Osgood's poem--It brilliantly underscores the nuances of leadership, collective responsibility, and the pitfalls of assumption and serves as a reminder that inaction can often stem from mere miscommunication or misplaced expectations. I also appreciate your take on balancing personal responsibilities with community involvement – a delicate equilibrium that every leader, in any capacity, strives to achieve. It's a lesson many of us need to hear, digest, and apply in our professional and personal spheres!

Thank you and glad to share! I love your phrase "the pitfalls of assumption" to highlight the issues around perceptions and communication when facing a difficult task.

Additionally, while the poem points to one source of inaction, it is always good to keep aware of the others. Resource constraints, sunk cost fallacy, perceived bureaucratic hurdles, fear of failure or feeling overwhelmed can paralyze the decision-making process. Being prepared to not only face internally these solution-stalling-states of mind and being able to help our teams/communities overcome them is no small leadership challenge. Put another way, we should always be ready to answer the "But what can I do?" question with realistic and impactful actions when seeking to make change in the world around us.

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