Make Space for New Mistakes to Happen

Luiza Trajano

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Luiza Trajano: "Everyone makes mistakes. You need to make space for new mistakes to happen. The important thing is to correct them quickly."
Luiza Trajano: "Everyone makes mistakes. You need to make space for new mistakes to happen. The important thing is to correct them quickly."
Image credit: DFID - UK Department for International Development via Wikimedia Commons

Luiza Trajano (1948-) is a Brazilian businesswoman and the richest woman in Brazil as of 2020.

Luiza's parents launched a retail store called "Magazine Luiza" in 1957. Under Luiza's guidance, Magazine Luiza has transformed from a single store to a chain of over 1,000 stores worth billions of dollars, serving over 18 million clients. During the initial spread of COVID-19 in Brazil, she helped small businesses thrive by building a digital platform for them to continue to deliver products.

Luiza is a feminist and has advocated and implemented policies to promote women's empowerment and racial equity within her office and throughout Brazil. She is an advisory board member to UNICEF Brazil and UNFPA Brazil, among others, she was listed as one of TIME's 100 most influential people of 2021 and the Financial Times' 25 most influential women of 2021.


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Kayla Kim

Marketing Manager, Laidlaw Foundation

Hello! I was Laidlaw scholar in 2019, and I studied national, regional, and local identity in northern Tajikistan through the lens of women's fashion. 

For a year after graduating, I worked for the UN Mine Action Service which removes landmines from conflict and post-conflict regions. Now I have returned to the Laidlaw Foundation!

Please feel free to get in touch. I'm always happy to meet new people and chat, especially about nationalism/politics of gender/Central Asia/demining/UN/writing or even ballroom dance :)