You may not feel comfortable leading a particular cause, but roll up your sleeves and do something.

Lori Lightfoot
You may not feel comfortable leading a particular cause, but roll up your sleeves and do something.
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Lori Lightfoot: “You may not feel comfortable leading a particular cause, but roll up your sleeves and do something.
Don't wait for [someone else to say] this is now our priority.”

This month, as we celebrate LGBTQ+ History Month and Black History Month (in the United States), we reflect on the power of taking action with a quote from Lori Lightfoot, a leader who personifies the spirit of leading proactively.


Education and Early Career

Born on August 4, 1962, in Massillon, Ohio, Lightfoot served as the 56th mayor of Chicago from 2019 to 2023. Lori Lightfoot's journey to becoming the first African-American woman and the first openly gay person to serve as the Mayor of Chicago began with significant legal and public service accomplishments before entering politics. She earned a Bachelor's degree in political science from the University of Michigan and later a Juris Doctor from the University of Chicago Law School. She started her career at the Mayer Brown law firm and served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois, where she handled cases of public corruption, fraud, and other serious crimes.

Striving for an equitable Chicago

Her commitment to public service led her to various oversight roles in Chicago, including leading the Chicago Police Accountability Task Force and serving as President of the Chicago Police Board, where she worked on police reform and accountability. Her public service roles prepared her for the mayoralty, where she focused on creating a more equitable Chicago. She strove to reduce corruption, increase police accountability, and promote social equity. During her tenure, she faced the immense challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic and civil unrest following the murder of George Floyd, showing her resilience and dedication to the city.

Reflecting on Lightfoot's Leadership

This Black History and LGBTQ+ History Month, let's honor leaders like Lori Lightfoot by committing to lead in our own lives, whether it's in small daily actions or larger societal contributions. Let's roll up our sleeves and get to work, leading through proactivity and an enduring commitment to a more equitable world.

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